Paul Brown

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Paul Brown

620 posts


No problem. There's an album of photos showing the RAF Museum's Seagull/Wlarus here, https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/locate_and_cement/supermarine-walrus-album-t5690.html , you might find they provide some useful info.

Paul Brown

620 posts


The kit was first released in 2010, so whilst not brand spanking new, it's not particularly old. Author and modeller Lynn Ritger, who is acknowledged as an authority on the Bf 109, rates it as one of the best available.

Paul Brown

620 posts


First off, welcome to the forum!

 

The Walrus had a mixed construction, essentially a dural skinned hull and fabric covered wings and empennage. The whole lot would have been painted with silver dope, a mixture of powdered aluminium with nitrocellulose, so really you're looking to replicate silver dope rather than natural metal. I confess I don't use Humbrol paint much these days and I have a hoard of other paint brands covering metallic and metallisers generally, but looking at Humbrol's paint chart, using Hu11 would seem to be a fair shout, personally I'd err towards Metalcote 27001, straight from the tin and without polishing it. 

Paul Brown

620 posts


Sticking with media that are within your comfort zone is not a bad thing, but then again being prepared to spread your wings a little and try out different stuff can lead to eureka moments. We tend to think of acrylic paints as being water based and not inclined to adhere well. That may be true of some aqueous acrylic brands but it's not necessarily true of all acrylic paints. Tamiya paints, for instance, are miscible with water but are spirit based and are pretty robust, even sprayed over bare plastic. I was a diehard enamel person until a friend who rates amongst the modelling 'experten' suggested it was about time I was using acrylics. I gave Tamiya a go and it was a revelation. More recently another modelling 'experten' suggested giving GS Mr Color a go would be a Good Thing. I tried it, another revelation. These are lacquer based acrylic paints that work like enamels, only better. GS Mr Hobby is aqueous enamel and also works very well, better than other aqueous acrylic that I've used. I have to admit that with all the new paint products that are springing up it can be a bit bewildering, but I'm much more open minded these days. I still have a heap of enamels amongst my paints and I haven't given up on them completely, but I'm much more likely to try new stuff these days.

 

Like Ratch, I've never had any issue with cleanup, yes acrylics can set faster, but a lot of the branded thinners contain a retarder these days. For aqueous acrylic, a flush through with water at the end of a session, followed by a back flush (block the nozzle and let the air bubble out through the paint cup), then a final flush through with 90% isopropyl should be good for the next session. I habitually strip down and deep clean everything, once you get into a routine it doesn't take long.

 

Just to show that I'm not completely 'agin' aqueous acrylic, here's a silver Meteor painted with Citadel Mithril Silver over white primer. The older Citadel paints were superb, not sure if the new stuff works quite as well.

 

  

Paul Brown

620 posts


I couldn't possibly comment! Innocent

Paul Brown

620 posts


@jopres57

I think the worst part of the article was the bit about Airfix having to recently borrow 18 million quid to stay in business. This is definitely not good news. There's also been no news yet about 2019 releases; should we worry?

Should we worry? No.

 

Airfix didn't borrow £18 million, the Hornby group did. Generally speaking and historically, Airfix has always  been and continues to be a profitable enterprise. Problems have almost invariably been as a result of events outside of Airfix itself. Hornby is still very much in business and I would expect it to continue so. As for this ridiculous 'news' story, I doubt it will have any impact on the affairs of Hornby, it's simply clickbait at the end of the silly season and they've nothing better to 'report'.

 

With regard to new releases, these are usually announced at the end of the year or early in the new year, with possibly a hint of what's to come at Scale Model World. Personally I can't keep up with the current schedule, let alone whatever's coming next.

Paul Brown

620 posts


If you're having problems with aqueous acrylic paint 'beading' - i.e. it won't spread properly and gathers into little droplets or pools - try adding a tiny smidge of detergent to the paint. It will help break the surface tension when the paint is applied. Washing up liquid usually works and when I say tiny smidge, just a hint of Fairy Liquid should do the trick. Paint bleed under masking can be fixed by firstly making sure it's well birnished down, then by painting either the base colour or clear coat up to the masking. Let it set nicely and then apply the second colour.

Paul Brown

620 posts


I think you might mean Mr Surfacer? I've never tried the aerosols because I have an airbrush, but Mr Surfacer is a superb filler-primer (although it is not adhesive).It comes in different grades, 500 is coarse, 1000 medium, 1200 fine and 1500 super fine. 500 and 1000 will deal with hairline gaps when sprayed on and when dry it is usually very smooth surfaced, if there is any tendency to grain a buff with a cloth will knock it off. For larger gap filling you can brush it on neat, this is also a good treatment for over-large engraved detail. If you buy the pots for airbrushing you will also need some Mr Color Levelling Thinner and thin 50/50. Mr Surfacer is very difficult to brush over large areas because it sets very rapidly.

Paul Brown

620 posts


Yes, the clipped wings were less prone to float, a little reduction in span equates to a little less lift. I don't think FAA Corsair pilots invented the curved approach per se, I'm pretty sure it was common practice with pilots operating types with limited forward vis, but it was probably the first use of the curved approach for carrier ops.. 

Paul Brown

620 posts


I wouldn't take issue with your sequencing. I wouldn't be too fussed about the media you use for washes, provided your clear coats are robust. Acrylic coats are good, because they are less likely to go yellow with age. You might find that washes work OK over polyurethane varnish which I believe was the base for the original Humbrol 'Cotes'. Also an acrylic sludge wash might work perfectly well over enamel varnish, although I won't use the latter, because I've had them turn yellow almost overnight on occasion. Acrylic sludge wash is a dash of acrylic paint mixed with water and a spot of detergent. I mostly use clay washes because they are completely inert and are easily removed from a gloss surface. You can use them over matt for deliberate staining, but once painted over a matt surface that's that. I've recently been experimenting with water based oil paints for washes, but so far the amount of experimentation has been insufficient to reach any hard and fast conclusions. I have one modelling acquaintance that swears by regular oil paints thinned with turpentine for washes and the results he gets are outstanding.

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