Dabhand

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dabhand

92 posts

currently john hiatt [any of his albums], judy garland [love her voice], and the rolling stones circa mid 1960s.

dabhand

92 posts

well, obviously an issue that appears to remain open!  i dug out the revell 1/32 spitfire instructions from the late 1960s and it advises light blue for the 'sky type s'! 

 

whatever the historical correctness, having a range of early spitfires sporting silver/silver-black/silver-black-white and pale green, i shall paint one featuring a pale blue just to add variety!  humbrol do a 'duck egg blue' [h23] which'll do nicely!

dabhand

92 posts

i'd buy all airfix releases when i was a boy [series 1-3, anything above being outside of pocket money range] and recall these figures quite fondly.  the 'imperial guardsman' made a super model, as you've demonstrated [alterations noted].

the polish lancer was also quite nice.  the british infantryman was a trifle thin i thought.

and it's nice to see that these kits are appreciated today - a good group build selection and a worthy model.

dabhand

92 posts

this image shows progress to date.  note that the figures have been attached to plastic card bases to enable them to 'stand'

note the grey filler used, lower torso, marking where the greatcoat tails are fixed.  these were overly broad which prevented them from 'lying' close to the rear and legs of the figure.  a bit more sanding/cutting away was necessary.  a lot of dry fitting was required to identify how the torso ought to be aligned to the legs as a degree of 'overhang' of the torso to the legs is required to cater for the separate coat tails. 

There are alternative tails for a tunic for which parts are provided.  generally, and in particular during the early part of the war, it is common to see photographs of infantry wearing the coat not the tunic - my word, it must have been hot.  photos show men in the tunic when other than in the front line, although there are images taken at verdun where it appears the tunic was worn in combat, generally without the back pack and satchels which were also part of the french infantrymans kit.

A lot of equipment is provided in the kit, including wire cutters, full canteen parts, a land telephone, and ammunition boxes for the early machine gun and half moon magazines for the chau-chat light machine gun.  gas mask cannisters are provided, but these are only relevant if horizon blue figures are to be made.

In passing, the chau-chat had a poor reputation being prone to jamming in particular given that one side of the half-moon magazine was open to the elements allowing mud and dirt to get in and foul the working parts.  overheating is said to have been common.  All the same, it was used from introduction until the war's end and was in fact one of the first 'lightweight' infantry machine guns capable of one man operation.

it was 'gas operated' but using a peculiar technique which is worth reading up on.  it had a peculiar method of carriage in combat - having no butt, the rear mounted pistol grip was anchored by the right hand and a small knob just forward of the trigger guard for the left.  this must have been quite akward and the soldier carrying one must have grabbed the open barrel from time to time and received a severe burn given it was unprotected.  Whilst an infantry soldier back in the eighties i saw a colleague burn his palm down to the bones when he grabbed the section gpmg machine gun by the barrel when on live fire exercises - i'll bet this was commonly done holding the chau-chat, which was also prone to overheating.

dabhand

92 posts

I've assembled the general figures less heads and accessories.  Instructions don't cover the assembly of the figures.  As each of the four is moulded on a quarter part of the single gatewok sprue (equipment and personal weapons appearing on a second gatework sprue) it's easy to ensure the correct parts are assembled to form each figure appropriately.

Alternate parts are provided for both the coat and the tunic - the difference between the two being provided for by appropriate length 'skirting'.  These parts are quite thick and require sanding down to ensure they dont stand too proudly from the figures.  

photos to follow.....

dabhand

92 posts

bought this as a boy - it was bagged as I recall.  went together very painlessly given the cabane struts moulded integral with fuselage halves.  had spanish civil war markings as indeed the do17 had at the time.

look forward to seeing completed model.  may dig out the example i've got stashed away.

 

dabhand

92 posts

completed this old kit a couple of years ago

the two part rear canopy is not too good and i suggest it's fitted to the fuselage at the bottom of each clear half and then each half joined.  this'll help to blend the canopy into the fuselage, but the fit is a little hit and miss!

a kit very much of its time and showing its age

dabhand

92 posts

Older kits of Battle of Britain fighters used to specify 'sky type s' or 'duck egg blue'.  i recall that airfix bottled paint featured 'duck egg blue' which I recall was specified as the undersurface colour scheme of the first generation Airfix Hurricane.

 

I'd read that duck egg blue was an intermediate colour used between the time of the black/white then medium grey undersurfaces and was anything but standardised being primarily applied at unit maintenance level.

 

My recent spitfires of the ealry war/BoB period are either black/white or 'sky' being the greenish variant.

 

I don't think I've seen 'duck egg blue' or 'sky type s' specified in the paint scheme of any recent spitfire/hurricane kit for quite a while.

 

So what was 'sky type s'/'duck egg blue' and was it a generally used undersurface colour for RAF fighters of the BoB period?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

dabhand

92 posts

bought the airfix 1/72 curtis p40 tomahawk gift set for a 'quick project'.  nearly done too.

recent airfix buys include the phantom and the mitchell.

and something quite different for me, the revell ww1 soldiers which includes 12 figures, 4 early war french, german and british

must learn to finish before buying another

dabhand

92 posts

..... re the 'poor fit' of the Airfix 1/48 buccaneer, i did a few of these and found that incremental gluing ensured the body parts matched up ok.  as i recall, the rest of the kit was ok.  resulted in really good models capturing the power of the aircraft better than a 1/72 scale model did/does.

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