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SA04017 Bristol Blenheim MkIV

@Dominic Thomas

As a final comment to KB666, I have exhausted my sources, with no joy on the code. Although I did find a fairly comprehensive write-up on the crash on the Aircrew Remembered website. 

If the code does come to light, I would be keen to know the source. Best of luck ....

 

Apologies to Heather for hijacking the post.

Many thanks to all and apologies to Heather for piggy-backing on her thread.  KB666 butting out!

Peter s

453 posts

KitBasher666: have you tried writing to the RAF museum at Hendon? My great-uncle was a bomb aimer in 4 engine bombers during the war and flew on some of the great raids. When he died we found his log books and donated them to Hendon. They've got a huge archive of historic sources and if you got a good contact there they might go above and beyond for you.

I researched my great-grandfathers WW1 records (to try and confirm an old family myth) and the staff at the Royal Artillery museum and at the current incarnation of his old unit were amazing. They found old officers diaries that mentioned him etc... loads of stuff you'd never find online. My only advice would be to provide as much info as you possibly can. Service number, dates etc. Some of these archives are a bit of a mess.

Peter S, thanks for the advice, but I have already tried that.  I even spoke to the RAF Air Historical Branch and have seen the original hand written records of the crash and all combat reports written by my uncle.  Whilst they can tell me the serial numbers of the engines (!) nothing records the individual aircraft letter.  I've drawn a blank.  I may have to resort to making a model of the aircraft he flew the day before, for which I have a photo.

Thanks to all for helping.

Paws4thot

1578 posts

@KitBasher666

Peter S, thanks for the advice, but I have already tried that.  I even spoke to the RAF Air Historical Branch and have seen the original hand written records of the crash and all combat reports written by my uncle.  Whilst they can tell me the serial numbers of the engines (!) nothing records the individual aircraft letter.  I've drawn a blank.  I may have to resort to making a model of the aircraft he flew the day before, for which I have a photo.

Thanks to all for helping.

If you know the name of your uncle's regular pilot, you could try asking which machine he normally flew on $squadron.

Though I fly through the shadow of the valley of death, I shall fear no evil, for I am at 65_000 feet and climbing.

Heather Kay

313 posts

After what seems like for ever, due to concentrating on clearing a couple of railway commissions through the workbench, I've found some time to track down a particular MkIV for this build.

 

I searched for suitable transfer sets that might fit the bill, but to no obvious avail. In the end, I selected an aircraft from my copy of On Target Battle of Britain 70th anniversary special: R3744 BL-K, 40 Squadron, RAF Wyton, Huntingdonshire, summer 1940. This plane fits the A scheme camo pattern I chose, and appears to have the "emergency" clear nose gun fitting. Using a mixture of the kit transfers and my stock of code letters and markings, I think I can make this aircraft up. The only annoyance is the aircraft ID letter K being outlined in white, but that should be fairly readily sorted.

 

With luck, I'll be able to get the decals on soon, get some flat varnish on, the masking off, and final details fitted.

A professional modeller of railway subjects, and a reborn Airfix fan. Definitely into combat aircraft in service on all sides in the summer of 1940, but known to occasionally veer off into other interesting things!

Heather Kay

313 posts

I think I'm nearly there.

 

 

A mix of generic and kit transfers went on to give me the national markings. 

 

 

To get the white outline on the aircraft ID letter, I used a draughting pen and white paint. I knew there was a good reason for choosing a letter with straight lines! The letters are 24in, which are a bit large to truly accurate, but they'll do for me. This image shows the model after a coat of satin varnish had been airbrushed over it. Sadly, the varnish spattered a little, so I left it to dry hard before dealing with it.

 

 

I carefully rubbed down the spatters and repaired the paintwork as necessary. I followed up with a brushed coat of satin varnish to try and impart a little life back into the airframe. Small paint repairs and various fixtures and fittings were done, so I'm left with installing the props and the antenna wire, with a smidge of weathering to complete. I must remember to take the masking off the landing lights, and dab some brick red over the wing machine gun port.

 

Once those bits are done, this model can join my Bomber Command fleet. The only gap now is the Fairey Battle. I wonder when we might get a new tool of that plane? Innocent

A professional modeller of railway subjects, and a reborn Airfix fan. Definitely into combat aircraft in service on all sides in the summer of 1940, but known to occasionally veer off into other interesting things!

Heather Kay

313 posts

And it's finished!

 

Bristol Blenheim MkIV, R3744 BL-K, No 40 Squadron, RAF Bomber Command, Wyton, Cambridgeshire, July 1940

 

Originally formed in February 1916, No 40 Squadron RFC was disbanded in 1919. In April 1931 it was reformed as a bomber squadron. At the outbreak of the Second Word War, the squadron was equipped with Fairey Battles and was sent to France as part of the BEF's Advanced Air Striking Force. In December 1939, the squadron was returned to the UK, at RAF Wyton, where it was converted to Blenheims. The unit continued daylight operations over France, flying from its UK base, through the Phoney War, the Battle of France, and during the Battle of Britain to attack the invasion barges being assembled by the German forces.

 

The squadron converted to Vickers Wellingtons in November 1940, flying night bombing missions. In late 1941 a detachment was sent to Malta, the whole squadron following in early 1942.

 

No 40 Squadron was disbanded in February 1957. Interestingly, it was slated for reformation as the first operational BAC TSR2 squadron, and then to fly the General Dynamics F-111. As both aircraft were cancelled, the unit remained out of service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The kit was built more or less out of the box, with markings cobbled together from the kit sheet and generic aftermarket sheets. The squadron codes are not quite correct in size, but I couldn’t find any suitable letters. No 40 Squadron outlines each aircraft identity letter in white, which I did with a bow pen and white paint. The model was brush painted with Xtracrylix, Humbrol and Revell acrylics, with some enamels used for detailing. Perhaps it’s time I considered making my own decals! The vehicles used are from Airfix and Flightpath.

 

I wonder what will fall off the stash shelf next!

A professional modeller of railway subjects, and a reborn Airfix fan. Definitely into combat aircraft in service on all sides in the summer of 1940, but known to occasionally veer off into other interesting things!

Dark Earth

190 posts

Very nicely done Heather.

What a great little dio !

Chris

John Symmons

1122 posts

Hi Heather.

 

Ditto to Dark Earths comments. Very nice build and display.

 

Remember we do this for fun                  John the Pom

Well done. A good model and a very nice scene with some interesting history to back it up. I particularly liked the change in impact from the semi-gloss to the matt finish.

Given the mix up in squadrons at the early stage, I wonder if you based the final diorama on a real 40 Squadron picture. I followed your link for the black & white 110 Squadron picture, and eventually found a colour version. It was particularly interesting to see the collector ring bronze.

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